SANTO DOMINGO._ Very little progress has being made in terms of the political crisis in Haiti, despite the changes that have taken place there since February 6 when interim President Jocelerme Privert replaced President Michel Martelly in office.

Privert is committed to building a consensus government, revitalizing the election court and handing in power to a president elect. In order to attain these goals, he aims to be the guarantor of all the political spheres; yet, his neutral stance is seen as his greatest flaw.

He has assumed the country’s fate amid a difficult economic situation with strong currency depreciation and more than five million citizens threatened by food insecurity.

SANTO DOMINGO._ Very little progress has being made in terms of the political crisis in Haiti, despite the changes that have taken place there since February 6 when interim President Jocelerme Privert replaced President Michel Martelly in office.His strongest disagreement with the old Haitian administration occurred when he detected serious problems in the public finances and prohibited the then Prime Minister Evans Paul and his officials to continue spending the government coffers.

Then he had another disagreement with the members of the previous administration when the former ruling Tet Kale Haitian Party (PHTK) and its allies became the new opposition members by questioning Privert’s decisions.

The crucial point of that difference was the stance adopted by those parties when they refused to approve the naming of economist Jean Fritz as prime minister and boycotted the investiture ceremony.

That stance was followed by actions aimed at reverting the situation, with the consequent use of their representatives in parliament to avoid ratifying the political declaration and delay the process.

Ever since the new Prime Minister was officially named on February 26, Privert has contacted different political parties to form a 120-day consensus government.

The factions that have refused to participate so far are the Platform Pitit Dessalines leftist party, the Struggling People‘s Organization, and the Association of Nationalist and Progressive Democrats, as well as the parties of the eight presidential candidates (G-8) that ignore the results of the elections held on October 25, 2015, considering them fraudulent.

According to analysts, Privert made the mistake of agreeing with the representatives of the former ruling party on the need to hold a runoff as soon as possible to be able to stay in power.

In meeting those demands, the interim president called to create a new election court without investigating the results of the first presidential election round to determine who would have benefited from the fraud.

For the old opposition represented by the G-8 and the Famni Lavalas party of former President Jean Bertrand Aristide, it is regrettable that Privert and Fritz fail to address the issue on election verification, which they consider essential to solve the political crisis.

If the election results would have been verified, the old opposition and the interim president would have come closer together, consequently being given more support from those sectors since he assumed power.

However, Lavalas has requested that Privert’s term in office be respected and urges the interim president to act in line with the people’s demands.

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