BRASILIA._ Elected by more than 54.5 million Brazilians to do a second term in office until 2018, President Dilma Rousseff has made it clear during the past few days that she will not resign from her post under any circumstances.

“My life has been complicated enough for me not to be able to fight now for democracy in Brazil”, the president said in a message spread on social networks. She also recalled the three years she spent in prison during the dictatorship and how she was severely tortured then.

BRASILIA._ Elected by more than 54.5 million Brazilians to do a second term in office until 2018, President Dilma Rousseff has made it clear during the past few days that she will not resign from her post under any circumstances.Rousseff, who has reiterated that she rules out any possibilities of resigning, was thus replying to a Folha de Sao Paulo daily’s editorial asking for her resignation.

Yet, the daily admits there to be no proof to conduct an impeachment process against her at the Chamber of Deputies for allegedly having broken the Law of Responsibility.

The analysis on whether the impeachment process is admissible or not, which might result in a political trial with views to dismiss her from the post, is conducted by a 65-member special commission. Most of them are members of the opposition or in favor of continuing with the process, while 40 of them at some point received donations from companies or subsidiaries from the companies that are being investigated.

Of these legislators, 16 are also being investigated by the Federal Supreme Court due to several crimes, mostly due to corruption.

Once the special commission makes a decision about the impeachment process, the Chamber of Deputies will have to gain the support of 342 of its 513 members for it to be continued. If so, the Senate will have the last word.

Several of the juridical authorities in Brazil have agreed to say that the legal moves against Rousseff to accuse her of breaking the Law of Responsibility do not have enough grounds for the charges and the impeachment process. In addition, the alleged crimes were committed in 2014 when the term was over.

In any case, the situation for the president is complicated. The government collation, headed by the Workers’ Party recently suffered a hard blow when the powerful Brazilian Democratic Movement Party led by Brazilian Vice President Michel Temer left the alliance.

Temer is said to be one of the architects behind the ongoing process against Rouseff.

On the other hand, the economy is not giving signs of recovery either. According to the latest report by the Brazilian Central Bank, the Gross Domestic Product is likely to drop for the second consecutive year in 2016, this time with an estimated 3.5 percent decrease, while inflation is expected to register at 6.6 percent.

The employment situation in Brazil is not promising either. According to the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics, nearly 9.10 million people were unemployed by the end of 2015, 2.4 percent more than in the fourth trimester of 2014.

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