Sections of the canoeing expedition from the Amazon to the Caribbean will be covered again as part of celebrations marking the 30th anniversary of that journey, the Antonio Núñez Jiménez Foundation for Nature and Man announced in Havana.

The institution will carry out different activities in 2017 to encourage the continuation of that project amid the new pro-integration context in Latin America and the Caribbean. It also aims to help boost comprehensive and sustainable development and promote the exchange of experiences on environmental culture through academic forums.

Sections of the canoeing expedition from the Amazon to the Caribbean will be covered again as part of celebrations marking the 30th anniversary of that journey, the Antonio Núñez Jiménez Foundation for Nature and Man announced in Havana.The program of activities will begin in Misahualli -the Ecuadorian indigenous community from where the expedition first left in 1987- with conferences, screenings of documentaries, collections, among other initiatives.

Similar activities have been scheduled for the Amazon localities of Iquitos (Peru), Leticia (Colombia), Manaos (Brazil), Ciudad Bolívar (Venezuela) and Santo Domingo, the organizers for the event informed.

Led by Dr. Antonio Núñez Jimenez, the first one year long expedition covered 17, 422 kilometers through 20 Latin American and Caribbean countries, and involved some 300 researchers from the region.

The late outstanding Cuban geographer, archaeologist and speleologist made sure that the journey, which finished in June 1988 in San Salvador, Bahamas, had a regional character with his objective being to bring science and culture together, particularly nature and anthropology.

„He wanted to give the vision of an America explored and studied by regional scientists,” Liliana Núñez, the scientist’s daughter and current president of the foundation, told The Havana Reporter.

He wanted to prove the theory about the settling of indigenous communities along the Amazon River basin, she explained.

Five canoes built using the original techniques covered the route, while the scientific studies conducted during the journey were included in two books: En canoa del Amazonas al Caribe (Canoeing from the Amazon to the Caribbean) and En canoa por el Mar de las Antillas (Canoeing through the Sea of the Antilles).

”That was one of the most important scientific expeditions organized by Cuba, because it brought together scientists from Ecuador, Peru, Colombia, Venezuela, Brazil, the Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, and St. Lucia,“ said Cuban geographer Ángel Graña, member of the expedition.

The journey proved that the trip from the basins of the Orinoco and Amazon Rivers to the Caribbean islands could be done using indigenous canoes, added Graña.

In addition, the expedition made valuable contributions in terms of regional flora and fauna, and highlighted the cultural, ethnic and natural richness of the Amazon and the Caribbean.

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