Cuba joined in the world call made in Paris, France, during the UN Conference on Climate Change, COP21, which closed with a new world agreement to preserve life on the planet.

Cuba joined in the world call made in Paris, France, during the UN Conference on Climate Change, COP21, which closed with a new world agreement to preserve life on the planet.The Cuban Minister of Science, Technology and the Environment, Elba Rosa Pérez told The Havana Reporter from France this is the starting point of a new phase in the struggle against global warming.

The Cuban minister said at the closing of the Paris Summit that although imperfect, what is now referred to as the Paris Agreement reflects the consensual work done with regard to climate events in the world for more than five years.

Pérez noted that all the issues raised by Cuba such asclimate adaptation, financing, technology transfer and the use of scientific results, among others, are included in the new agreement.

The Paris Agreement establishes a difference between actions to be undertaken by developed countries and those by developing nations, the Cuban minister pointed out.

Cuba conveyed an open message during the COP21 presidential meeting, affirming that the current battle against climate change is closely related to the need for establishing a new international economic order, eliminating poverty, and changing current production and consumption patterns.

Cuba joined in the world call made in Paris, France, during the UN Conference on Climate Change, COP21, which closed with a new world agreement to preserve life on the planet.By voicing its concerns at the Climate Summit, Cuba spoke on behalf of, amongst other groups, most developing countries, the Bolivarian Alliance for the Peoples of Our America (ALBA) and small island states.

In his COP21 address, Cuba’s First Vice President Miguel Díaz-Canel, quoted the leader of the Cuban Revolution Fidel Castro’s warning that “a major biological species was at risk of extinction due to the rapid and progressive destruction of its natural living conditions: the human being.”

Díaz-Canel highlighted the necessity for global temperature stability of 1.5 degrees Celsius, as reasonably requested by small developing island states, most affected by climate change.

He reiterated Cuba’s stance in favor of an agreement that entails a strong global commitment for reducing greenhouse gases, based on the principle of shared but differentiated responsibilities.

He said that the adverse effects of climate change cannot be fought by hindering the development of those countries that need it the most, or by hindering national efforts for the eradication of poverty and hunger.

The Le Bourget exhibition park in the French capital hosted the 195 countries that reached a historic agreement on climate change, aiming to keep the rise in temperatures this century well below 2 degrees Celsius and encouraging efforts for a reduction to below 1.5 degrees, relative to pre-industrial levels.

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