After almost six decades involved in research, the Cuban scientific community recently celebrated its day with different contributions for improving environmental preservation, human health, agricultural, livestock and technical development, among others.

After almost six decades involved in research, the Cuban scientific community recently celebrated its day with different contributions for improving environmental preservation, human health, agricultural, livestock and technical development, among others.First celebrated in 1990, the Day of Cuban Science honors a quote by the leader of the Cuban Revolution, Fidel Castro, who foretold just one year after the triumph of the Revolution in 1959 that “Cuba‘s future must necessarily be a future of people of science.”

This Cuban sector has shown a steady development ever since; something the scientific community has rated as early for its time. In biotechnology alone, the first such steps were made in the 1980s, at a point when the first biotechnology companies were only just being opened in the United States, and ten years before similar advances were recorded in Europe, Cuban scientists explained.

A foresighted approach allowed for the creation of what is known in Cuba as the Scientific Pole, which comprises more than 30 institutions with strong scientific-technical potential, according to official estimates.

These entities involve some 7,000 professionals, many of whom have master’s degrees and PhDs.

These professionals have developed biotechnological medicinal products and vaccines that are currently exported to all five continents.

The list of biotechnological products is long indeed. The latest of such examples was recently announced by a multidisciplinary team related to the implementation of the next phase for a clinical trial that already showed promising results in the first experimental stages.

It is a drug candidate for reducing the size of the myocardial infarction, Jorge Berlanga told the press leader of the study, who previously developed Heberprot P, the only medicine in the world for treating diabetic foot ulcers.

After almost six decades involved in research, the Cuban scientific community recently celebrated its day with different contributions for improving environmental preservation, human health, agricultural, livestock and technical development, among others.The results in this discipline, according to specialists, are not only the fruit of the growth registered by this activity, but also of increasing relationships between the scientific community and Cuban society.

This relationship has allowed for concrete achievements over the years.

A few examples: All Cuban newborns get immunized against 13 diseases with the medicine injected mostly being produced on the island.

For eight consecutive years, the infant mortality rate has closed in below five, in this case 4.3 per each 1,000 live births.

Another highlight: in 2015 the under-five mortality rate closed in at 5.7 per each 1,000 live births, which has remained below six for four years in a row.

Cuba’s contributions to the health sector have not only benefited the Cuban people but also citizens from around the world, according to analysts.

In 2015, the island became the first country in the World to have eliminated mother-to-child transmission of HIVAIDS and syphilis.

This achievement, experts agree, paves the way for attaining other goals: generations free from HIV-AIDS, a disease that had the world in suspense in the 1980s and is still affecting millions of people worldwide.

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