HAVANA.- A new investigation has revealed that the Havana Bay was populated by flamingos, Cuban trogons, parrots, macaws and other birds that arenot currently seen in the capital of Cuba.

HAVANA.- A new investigation has revealed that the Havana Bay was populated by flamingos, Cuban trogons, parrots, macaws and other birds that arenot currently seen in the capital of Cuba.The results from a study organized by the Archaeological department of the Havana Historian’s Office (GAOHH in Spanish) confirm that the Havana Bay was also a common place for other species that at present aren’t frequently spotted like the cranes.

Additionally, thanks to the excavations associated with this investigation it was revealed that chicken and duck were recurrent in the diet of the first people of Havana, like oysters; an element which has now practically disappeared from the Cuban daily diet.

According to the paleontologist Roger Arrazcaeta, in 13 old parts of the capital more than 50 species of bird have been identified, three of them being domestic and 49 being indigenous.

The study promoted by the GAOHH is focused on the work of ‘quarry holes’, full of remains that date from the second half of the 16th century until the end of the 19th century.

HAVANA.- A new investigation has revealed that the Havana Bay was populated by flamingos, Cuban trogons, parrots, macaws and other birds that arenot currently seen in the capital of Cuba.The head of GAOHH, Osvaldo Jiménez specified that at the beginning almost all of Havana was full of these holes because the people, when building would extract the required construction materials from the ground in order to save themselves a large amount of money in buying the materials and transporting them.

Arrazcaeta insisted on the necessity of disclosing the findings from investigations like this one to the people as they enrich the national culture through links in the community.

Specialists warned equally that amidst the big economic changes that the country is going through, a greater desire for a black market which exploits the nation’s assets may be generated.

It is fundamental to protect the Cuban zoological and archaeological wealth as it will in turn leave behind another type of evidence: clues that in years to come will help others understand the human way of life, said Arrazcaeta.

Share on FB Share on TT