The Constitution of Jimaguayú, born 120 years ago in “Cuba Libre” (Free Cuba), now has an even greater historical c o n n o t a t i o n as the original text has been included in the UNESCO N a t i o n a l World Memory Program.

The important document, believed to have been a copy, has been in the Cuban National Archive since 1944. Experts established its authenticity and fully restored it order for it to be conserved as a national documentary treasure.

The Constitution of Jimaguayú, born 120 years ago in “Cuba Libre” (Free Cuba), now has an even greater historical c o n n o t a t i o n as the original text has been included in the UNESCO N a t i o n a l World Memory Program.It was drafted and approved during the first Constituent Assembly of the 1895-1898 War of Independence in order to establish the institutions and offices of the Republic of Cuba in Arms.

The 20 representatives of the five Liberation Army corps met between September 13-18, 1895 in Jimaguayú, in the Camagüey province; where Major General Ignacio Agramonte (1894-1873)- one of the authors of the 1869 Guaimaro Constitution – fell in combat.

Of the mostly younger generation revolutionary delegates, 13 were lawyers, doctors, journalists or other professionals.

The text signed on September 16, contains the decision to divide civil and military functions, to be overseen separately by a Council of Government with executive and legislative powers and the nomination of a General in Chief and subordinate Lieutenant General to substitute him in the case of absence.

The Constitution of Jimaguayú, born 120 years ago in “Cuba Libre” (Free Cuba), now has an even greater historical c o n n o t a t i o n as the original text has been included in the UNESCO N a t i o n a l World Memory Program.Maximo Gomez, elected in 1892 by the Cuban Revolutionary Party who had organized the war, was ratified as General in Chief and Antonio Maceo his designated Lieutenant General.

The Constitution, valid for two years until the 1897 Yaya Constituent Assembly, represented a significant measure to avoid problems that arose in the politicalmilitary leadership during the Ten Year War (1868-1878).

The Foundation Law of the Republic, with civil and political principles enshrined within the Constitution of 1940, granted legislative and constitutional power to the Council of Ministers, in keeping with both previous “Mambise” constitutions.

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