International organizations and experts have recognized Cuba in the area of youth development and the leading role played by this age group in the implementation of public policies intended to respond to their needs.

International organizations and experts have recognized Cuba in the area of youth development and the leading role played by this age group in the implementation of public policies intended to respond to their needs.At the II International Congress of Researchers on Youth, held in Havana between last March 30 and April 2, representatives of world bodies and 255 delegates from Cuba and more than 15 other countries agreed that the Caribbean island is a world leader on such matters.

According to Ernesto Rodríguez, director of the Latin American Youth Center (CELAJU in Spanish), development indexes in Cuba for these age groups place the country first in Latin America and the Caribbean and 11th in the world, behind only industrialized nations.

He confirmed that thanks to its social policies, Cuba extensively surpassed even countries of greater economic and geopolitical relevance, which made it a difficult case to compare.

Rodríguez’s views are supported in recent studies by the Commonwealth Youth Program, the Economic Commission For Latin America and the Caribbean(Cepal in Spanish) and the Ibero-American Youth Organization (OIJ in Spanish, )that apply reference indicators in the areas of education, health, well-being, employment, political participation and civicism.

International organizations and experts have recognized Cuba in the area of youth development and the leading role played by this age group in the implementation of public policies intended to respond to their needs.Katherin Muller, UNESCO’s regional director of Latin American and Caribbean Culture, used similar terms when confirming with The Havana Reporter that Cuba has high levels in organizational experience and in development articulated in projects to ensure compliance with the rights and welfare of its youth.

OIJ’s general secretary, Max Trejo, said that this is the ideal country for experts on youth to exchange ideas and perspectives in order to better direct regional initiatives.

The more than 300 papers presented at the gathering highlight the need to articulate policies for young people that are purposefully taken on board byrelevant bodies and entities.

During the second edition of the Congress, the legacy of Fidel Castro, historic leader of the Cuban Revolution –considered to be the principal promoter of the participation of young people in national development – was explored.

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