HAVANA.- The government of Colombia and the country’s largest guerrilla uphold their willingness to reach a definite peace agreement in 2016, despite the differences that prevented them from reaching it on March 23 as it had been agreed.

 The government of Colombia and the country’s largest guerrilla uphold their willingness to reach a definite peace agreement in 2016, despite the differences that prevented them from reaching it on March 23 as it had been agreed.To reach that objective, the peace representatives of the Juan Manuel Santos government and the Revolutionary Armed forces of Colombia-People´s Army (FARC-EP) will have to settle those differences.

Topics such as amnesty, the bilateral ceasefire and putting an end to hostilities, the laying down of weapons, and the execution of actions to ensure juridical security, as well as the effective implementation of all these commitments have currently been focused on during the peace talks.

The head of the governmental delegation Humberto de la Calle recently said in Havana that major differences prevailed in the talks on “pressing issues” and “extremely sensitive” affairs, which stopped a functional agreement from being reached between the two sides on the agreed date.

De la Calle noted that they would not reach agreements in any old way but in a way that allowed the conflict to be brought to an end under terms that ensure both sides’ safety, mainly for Colombians living in the countryside and for the FARC-EP members, who need to be guaranteed full security.

 The government of Colombia and the country’s largest guerrilla uphold their willingness to reach a definite peace agreement in 2016, despite the differences that prevented them from reaching it on March 23 as it had been agreed.Regarding this, the head of the guerrilla delegation, Iván Márquez, pointed out that the talks are analyzing a projected roadmap that summarizes the most important topics addressed by the two sides while proposing ways for solving pending issues.

Expected to be approved during the next round of talks in April, the roadmap contains objectives, conditions and specific dates intending to make the year 2016, the year of peace, he commented.

After more than three and a half years of talks, the representatives of the government and Colombia’s oldest guerrilla have reached a consensus on issues related to comprehensive agricultural development, political participation, the anti-drug fight and victims of the conflict.

The agreements reached in Havana defining this process as the most successful ever implemented for Colombia, as well as the two parties’ will to bring it to a happy end despite its complex nature, have raised hopes for reaching a political solution after more than 50 years of social and armed conflict in the country.

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